Vagus nerve stimulation for drug-resistant epilepsy: A European long-term study up to 24 months in 347 children.

Epilepsia. 2014 Sep 17. doi: 10.1111/epi.12762. [Epub ahead of print]

Vagus nerve stimulation for drug-resistant epilepsy: A European long-term study up to 24 months in 347 children.

Orosz I1, McCormick D, Zamponi N, Varadkar S, Feucht M, Parain D, Griens R, Vallée L, Boon P, Rittey C, Jayewardene AK, Bunker M, Arzimanoglou A, Lagae L.

Author information
  • 1Department of Neuropediatrics, Children’s Hospital, University of Leubeck, Leubeck, Germany.
Abstract
OBJECTIVE:

To gain insight into the long-term impact of vagus nerve stimulation (with VNS Therapy) in children with drug-resistant epilepsy, we conducted the largest retrospective multicenter study to date over an extended follow-up period of up to 24 months.

METHODS:

The primary objective was to assess change in seizure frequency of the predominant seizure type (defined as the most disabling seizure) following VNS device implantation. Treating physicians collected data from patient records from baseline to 6, 12, and 24 months of follow-up.

RESULTS:

The analysis population included 347 children (aged 6 months to 17.9 years at the time of implant). At 6, 12, and 24 months after implantation, 32.5%, 37.6%, and 43.8%, respectively, of patients had ≥50% reduction in baseline seizure frequency of the predominant seizure type. The responder rate was higher in a subgroup of patients who had no change in antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) during the study. Favorable results were also evident for all secondary outcome measures including changes in seizure duration, ictal severity, postictal severity, quality of life, clinical global impression of improvement, and safety. Post hoc analyses demonstrated a statistically significant correlation between VNS total charge delivered per day and an increase in response rate. VNS Therapy is indicated as adjunctive therapy in children with focal, structural epilepsies, who for any reason are not good candidates for surgical treatment following the trial of two or more AEDs. Children with predominantly generalized seizures from genetic, structural epilepsies, like Dravet syndrome or Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, could also benefit from VNS Therapy.

SIGNIFICANCE:

The results demonstrate that adjunctive VNS Therapy in children with drug-resistant epilepsy reduces seizure frequency and is well tolerated over a 2-year follow-up period. No new safety issues were identified. A post hoc analysis revealed a dose-response correlation for VNS in patients with epilepsy.

Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

KEYWORDS:

Clinical trial; Epilepsy; Pediatrics; Quality of life; Vagus nerve stimulation

PMID:

25231724

[PubMed – as supplied by publisher] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25231724
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About vnstherapy

I'm a very, very long-time support person and health care and mental health advocate/activist for my spouse Joyce as well as to others. I'm also a retired business executive and former Board Member, President and facilitator of a local chapter of DBSA as well as a Florida State appointment as a Guardian Advocate. I do not endorse, promote or advertise for any therapy, product or company. I do share our personal experiences, my research and knowledge in the hope it might benefit someone or do I give advice as to what one should or shouldn't do. I extend my best wishes for wellness to one and all and all the good you’d wish for yourselves.
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